London Southend Airport & Environs Joint Area Action Plan

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London Southend Airport and Environs Joint Area Action Plan Submission Document

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View Comments (17) 4. Policies

Summary of Policies

NPPF Sustainability Policy

Employment Policies

Policy E1 - General Development Considerations

Policy E2 - Aviation Way Industrial Estate

Policy E3 - Saxon Business Park

Policy E4 - Phasing of Saxon Business Park

Policy E5 - Development of Area 1A –Saxon Business Park

Policy E6 - Development of Area 1B –Saxon Business Park

Policy E7 - Development of Area 2 – Saxon Business Park

Policy E8 - Nestuda Way Business Park

Airport Policies

Policy LS1 - General Policy

Policy LS2 - Development at London Southend Airport

Policy LS3 - Noise

Policy LS4 - Noise Compensation and Purchase Scheme

Policy LS5 - Airport Surface Access Strategy

Policy LS6 - Public Safety Zones

Policy LS7 - Operation of the New Runway

Policy LS8 - Air Quality Monitoring

Policy TF1 - Expansion of New Terminal

Policy MRO1 - Northern MRO

Policy MRO2 - Northern MRO Extension

Policy MRO3 - Southern MRO Zone

Policy ADZ1 - Existing terminal area

Transport Policies

Policy T1 - Access to development Areas

Policy T2 - Access to Saxon Business Park

Policy T3 - Travel Planning

Policy T4 - Public transport

Policy T5 - Walking and Cycling

Policy T6 - Freight and Network Management

Policy T7 - Network Capacity Improvements

Environmental Policies

Policy ENV1 - Revised Green Belt Boundary

Policy ENV2 - New Public Open Space – North

Policy ENV3 - Green Buffer South

Policy ENV4 - Country Park; Access and Facilities

Policy ENV5 - Green Corridor to Business Park

Policy ENV6 - Green Buffer East of Railway

Policy ENV7 - Environmental Sustainability

Introduction

This chapter of the plan sets out the policies that are intended to deliver the development proposals outlined in Chapter 3. The chapter is divided into four key policy areas dealing with employment, the airport, transport and the environment.

NPPF Sustainability Policy

When considering development proposals the Councils will take a positive approach that reflects the presumption in favour of sustainable development contained in the National Planning Policy Framework. It will always work proactively with applicants jointly to find solutions which mean that proposals can be approved wherever possible, and to secure development that improves the economic, social and environmental conditions in the area.

Planning applications that accord with the policies in this AAP (and, where relevant, with polices in neighbourhood plans) will be approved without delay, unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

Where there are no policies relevant to the application or relevant policies are out of date at the time of making the decision then the Council will grant permission unless material considerations indicate otherwise – taking into account whether:

  • Any adverse impacts of granting permission would significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits, when assessed against the policies in the National Planning Policy Framework taken as a whole; or
  • Specific policies in that Framework indicate that development should be restricted.

Employment policies

Introduction

As explained in Section 3, the policy approach is to pursue high scale employment growth within the area that will make a significant contribution to the sub-regions employment aspirations. The aim is to encourage employment for both aviation-related growth (associated with airport growth) and for wider B-class sector growth in the form of a new business park (Saxon Business Park) to the north of the existing Aviation Way Industrial Estate and at land to the west of Nestuda Way alongside an intensification of use with Aviation Way Industrial Estate itself.

General Development Considerations

The employment policies propose that land be allocated to accommodate up to 109,000m2 of additional floorspace, with 99,000m2 of that total being in a major new business park, Saxon Business Park, north of the existing Aviation Way Industrial Estate, which will accommodate up to 4,950 additional jobs in the area over the planning period to 2031 and beyond. The balance will be located on a small new business park at Nestuda Way, which will accommodate 500 jobs. In addition, it is anticipated that intensification and redevelopment on the existing Aviation Way Industrial Estate will provide a further 15,000m2 of floorspace and deliver 750 jobs.

Together, the above allocations will deliver 4,200 additional jobs (excluding direct airport related employment) in the period to 2021 and 2,000 additional jobs in the period post 2021. A further 1,180 additional jobs will be created within the boundary of London Southend Airport in the period to 2021.

View Comments (18) Policy E1 - General Development Considerations

The JAAP area will be developed as a strategic employment area to support the delivery of an additional 5380 jobs in the period to 2021, including employment directly related to the airport. This total will contribute to the delivery of the jobs totals for Rochford DC and Southend BC – the apportionment to each district will be based on a 50-50 split of the overall jobs total to be provided within the JAAP area.

The JAAP area will support the delivery of an additional 2,000 jobs in the period post 2021 through further development of the Saxon Business Park and the development of the Nestuda Business Park.

The general principles for the development of the business parks will be set out in design briefs to be prepared and published prior to any development commencing. The design briefs will set out a framework for the general layout, appearance and design principles of the business parks.

Aviation Way Industrial Estate

Aviation Way is a 22 hectare employment area located to the west of the airport and offers a range of office, industrial, and leisure-type premises with current provision amounting to approximately 80,000m2. The Airport’s Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul (MRO) Northside area is located within the centre of Aviation Way. The JAAP allocated MRO Northside extension area lies adjacent to the north-eastern edge of Aviation Way.

Aviation Way Industrial Estate offers a variety of employment stock ranging from small ‘lock-up’ establishments to purpose built office accommodation. Generally over 75% of the employment stock is in a good or very good condition. Large parts of the estate are in non B-class use, most notably the Athenaeum Club and spa, whilst there are a number of areas of vacant or underutilised land. This offers the opportunity to increase employment space through a combination of restructuring and intensification.

The Aviation Way estate road runs through the employment area and is generally regarded by users to be below standard for this type of access road with some poor surfacing, a lack of street lighting and limited facilities for pedestrians and cyclists. To support these proposals to intensify and enhance the existing employment area, the road has been identified as in need of upgrading to adoptable highway standards, together with designated routes for pedestrian and cyclists and improvements to the southern road junction at Eastwoodbury Lane.

Aviation Way provides the closest access to Eastwoodbury Lane, existing bus services and cycle routes. There is an opportunity to link the new business park with Aviation Way for bus access, walking and cycle routes.

Small parts to the south of the Estate, adjacent to Eastwood Brook, are within Flood Zones 2 & 3. As such, development proposals should, in the first instance, be focussed on areas of the Estate that fall within Flood Zone 1. Site specific Flood Risk Assessments (FRAs) will be required to support all planning applications affecting the Flood Zone 2 and 3 areas.

View Comments (12) Policy E2 - Aviation Way Industrial Estate

Within Aviation Way Industrial Estate, the area shown as existing employment on the Proposals Map, applications for development within use classes B1 and B2 will be welcomed. It is expected that redevelopment and intensification within this area will accommodate an additional 750 jobs.

A flood risk assessment will be required to be submitted with all planning applications to demonstrate that any development will be safe for its lifetime, without increasing flood risk elsewhere.

Saxon Business Park

The release of land for the provision of a high quality business park is required in order to enable Rochford and Southend-on-Sea to meet the demand for B1 and associated B2 Use Class development generated by the growth of London Southend Airport as well as broader demand in the economic sub-region.

In their review of Rochford District Council’s Employment Land Study, GVA Grimley state:

‘Our analysis shows that growth in business numbers at Bournemouth Airport was 25% between 2003 and 2007 which coincided with exponential growth in passenger numbers. This gives an indication of the potential for a similar increase in employment demand relating to the expansion of Southend Airport. Further analysis of the B Class commercial floorspace provision at Bournemouth Airport shows that around 180,000 m2 is provided within its environs. This compares to the current provision of 84,000 m2 of B Class employment floorspace at Southend Airport. Considering these two factors we estimate that an expansion of Southend Airport may provide additional demand for B Class floorspace of 100,000 m2 which can be met by the JAAP proposed provision at Saxon Business Park’.

The Homes and Communities Agency’s ‘Employment Densities Guide – 2nd Edition 2010’ sets out ‘employment density ratios’ for forms of employment development. For office uses these are based upon Net Internal Area (NIA), which is calculated as 80% of gross internal area (GIA).

For business park developments the guide suggests an area of 10m2 per full time equivalent job and 36m2 per FTE for B2 uses. However, general office development is calculated at one FTE per 12m2 and the document suggest a density figure of one FTE per 11.4m2 in out of town locations.

In respect to the proposed development at Saxon Business Park this would provide for the following job numbers per phase:

Area 1A – 20,000m2 GIA providing for 16,000m2 NIA. Assuming a figure of one FTE job per 11.4m2 would provide 1403 jobs. However, factoring in a 25% vacancy rate at any time the development would provide 1,052. This is rounded down to 1,000 for the purposes of this document. Consideration may also be given to education uses to complement and support the business park.

Area 1B – 49,000m2 of development. Assuming an 80/20 split this would provide 39,200m2 GIA of B1 accommodation and 9,800m2 of B2 accommodation. For the B1 accommodation, factoring in a 25% vacancy rate, this would provide for circa 2,060 FTE jobs. For the B2 accommodation circa 400 FTE jobs would be provided.

Area 2 - 30,000m2 GIA providing for 24,000m2 NIA. Assuming a figure of one FTE job per 11.4m2 would provide 2105 jobs. However, factoring in a 25% vacancy rate at any time the development would provide 1,578. This is rounded down to 1,500 for the purposes of this document.

The general principles for the development of the business park will be set out in a Masterplan/design brief to be prepared and published prior to any development commencing. The Masterplan/design brief will set out a framework for the layout, appearance and design principles of the business park.

View Comments (8) Policy E3 - Saxon Business Park

Within the proposed employment areas shown as 1A, 1B and 2 on the Proposals Map, applications for development will be welcomed which at least deliver, or proportionately contribute in land take towards achieving, the following schedule:

Area Use class Floorspace Jobs

Area 1A B1/Education 20,000 1,000
Area 1B B1 and B2 49,000 2,450
Area 2 B1 30,000 1,500

In the case of Area 1B, Use Class B2 uses will be considered acceptable where they complement and support the B1 uses, and strengthen the role of the new employment land as a high quality business park, as set out in other policies within this plan. Whilst, the local authorities do not want to be overly prescriptive about the uses that will be accommodated within the business park, it is expected that the layout will include a number of sustainable and eco-friendly business start-up units.

Supporting non B1/B2 uses may be acceptable where it can be demonstrated that these uses are necessary to support the operation and/or the requirements of employees working in the business park. It is expected that the release of the allocated land will be in phases as specified in Policy E4.

All phases of development will be required to contribute towards new public open space to the north and east of the business park, as shown on the Proposals Map.

Phasing of Saxon Business Park

It is expected that, owing to the current economic climate and to ensure a balance of development between the new business park and established town centre locations, the business park will be released for development in phases. Phases 1A and 1B will be released in the period to 2021 with phase 2 being released thereafter unless it is demonstrated that the phase is required sooner.

View Comments (6) Policy E4 - Phasing of Saxon Business Park

The phased release of the business park will be as follows:

It is expected that Area 1A will be developed as the first phase of the business park. Area 1B may be developed in parallel if a development proposal requiring B1 and B2 uses is proposed.

Area 2 will be reserved for development post 2021, unless shown to be required sooner. In any event, this final phase of the business park can proceed only once the Westcliff Rugby Club has been relocated and is operational.

Development of Area 1A –Saxon Business Park

This 5.5 hectare site was previously a brickworks which is now no longer operational. Eight terraced properties back onto the brickworks site. An underpass with foot/ cycle/ equestrian access links the site to land west of Cherry Orchard way (proposed access point for Cherry Orchard Silver Jubilee Country Park). It is understood that the brickworks is now closed as the reserves are exhausted. The buildings have been removed however there are hardstandings remaining and the site has not been restored fully to agriculture.

Development of the site will be subject to the Masterplan/design brief to be prepared and published prior to any development commencing. The Masterplan/design brief will set out a framework for the layout, appearance and design characteristics of the business park.

The Masterplan will include a landmark building providing a key entrance feature to the site. This should be augmented by public art and business park signage clearly articulating the sites identity as a high quality business park. Development of the site will also be required to fund enhancements to walking and cycling provision alongside the provision of a contribution to enhancing public transport.

View Comments (6) Policy E5 - Development of Area 1A –Saxon Business Park

The development of Area 1A will include a landmark building and entrance feature/gateway establishing the identity of the area as a high quality business park. In addition, the development of this area will be required to provide a new junction to provide access to the business park from Cherry Orchard Way. The initial section of the new access road and green corridor from the new junction required to enable access to the development may be funded by Southend Borough Council or via other mechanisms such as the Growing Places Fund, but the cost will be recouped as development progresses.

Development of Area 1B – Saxon Business Park

Area 1B lies to the north of the eastern end of Aviation Way Industrial Estate. The site is approximately 12.5ha, is currently used for agricultural purposes and lies within metropolitan Green Belt.

Development of the site will be subject to the Masterplan/design brief to be prepared and published prior to any development commencing. The Masterplan/design brief will set out a framework for the layout, appearance and design principles of the business park.

Development of the site will also be required to fund enhancements to walking and cycling provision alongside the provision of a contribution to enhancing public transport.

View Comments (3) Policy E6 - Development of Area 1B –Saxon Business Park

The development of Area 1B will include the extension of the access road so far as this is required to enable the development of the business park prior to the occupation of any buildings.

Development of Area 2 –Saxon Business Park

Area 2 of the proposed Saxon Business Park comprises approximately 8 hectares of land currently used as rugby pitches by Westcliff Rugby Club.

The development of Area 2 will be required to fund the relocation of the rugby club, including setting out the pitches and provision of new club house facilities. This replacement must be at least equivalent to the existing site in terms of the quantity and quality of facility provided and at least equivalent in terms of tenure/management arrangements.

The site is also bordered by the grade II listed building, Cherry Orchard Farm. The Masterplan/Development Brief for the site will be required to incorporate a green buffer zone and landscaping around the building to preserve the rural character of its setting

View Comments (7) Policy E7 - Development of Area 2 – Saxon Business Park

The development of Area 2 will be required to fund the relocation of the rugby club, including setting out the pitches and provision of new club house facilities. This replacement must be at least equivalent to the existing site in terms of the quantity and quality of facility provided and at least equivalent in terms of tenure/management arrangements.

Nestuda Way Business Park

The site at Nestuda Way is situated in a prime location with good accessibility to the A127, and the major road network. It lies on the corner of Prince Avenue and Nestuda Way and is currently open land which falls adjacent to the Airport runway public safety zone.

The Homes and Communities Agency’s ‘Employment Densities Guide – 2nd Edition 2010’ sets out ‘employment density ratios’ for forms of employment development. For office uses these are based upon Net Internal Area (NIA), which is calculated as 80% of gross internal area. Nestuda Way would provide 8,000m2 of NIA. The HCA guide suggests an area of 12m2 per full time equivalent job. This would provide for circa 666 FTE jobs at Nestuda Way. However, factoring in a 25% vacancy rate would provide for the development supporting 500 FTE jobs.

In view of the current suppressed economic market it is envisaged that the development at Nestuda Way will take place in the period post 2021. This will enable the establishment of the Business Park at Saxon Business Park whilst also supporting the regeneration of Southend Town Centre.

Owing to its location, development of the site will need to be carefully considered to ensure a strong visual frontage to the A127 to the south of the site. The form of the building(s) will also need to be in accordance with the height limitations dictated by to its proximity to the Airport Runway Public Safety Zone.

The site is well located in relation to local amenities. However, development will need to fund enhancements to walking and cycling provision alongside the provision of a contribution to enhancing public transport.

The general principles for the development of the business park will be set out in a Masterplan/design brief to be prepared and published prior to any development commencing. The Masterplan/design brief will set out a framework for the layout, appearance and design characteristics of the business park.

View Comments (6) Policy E8 - Nestuda Way Business Park

Within the proposed Nestuda Way Business Park applications for development within Use Class B1 will be expected in the period post 2021. It is expected that the site is capable of accommodating 10,000 sq. metres of floorspace, delivering at least 500 jobs. The design, sustainability and quality of buildings within the business park will need to be carefully considered and provide an appropriate visual frontage to the A127.

London Southend Airport

Introduction

It is expected that London Southend Airport will provide a significant boost to the economy of Southend, Rochford and the wider economic area of South Essex both through direct employment at the airport as well as raising the profile of the area for inward investment. However, to support this growth London Southend Airport must be able to accommodate new and future aircraft models that are quieter and more fuel efficient as well as ensuring that aircraft with a seating capacity of up to 150 passengers can reach appropriate and desirable destinations. Therefore, the JAAP sets out a policy framework to support the development of the airport to grow to handle a capacity of up to 2 million passengers per annum (mppa), and significant progress has already been made through an extension of the runway to provide a net useable length of 1,799 metres, a new railway station, terminal, aircraft handling facilities and a hotel.

It is anticipated that the airport will be used primarily for passengers supporting a number of Fixed Based Operators (FBOs). However, it is also expected that the airport will see growth in its existing maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities (MRO) supporting the provision of a range of high skilled jobs in the area. It is not considered desirable for the airport to handle significant volumes of freight due to its location and the pressure that this would place on the local and wider highway network, although it is recognised that some growth in the handling of niche (high value, low volume) cargo could be taken forward without compromising the airport’s core passenger and MRO functions.

Expansion is, however, only acceptable if it is undertaken subject to strict environmental controls, which will ensure that the environment of Southend, Rochford and the wider area is not significantly affected. This will include environmental scrutiny of any proposed developments (including Environmental Impact Assessment). Controlling aircraft noise is particularly important as the airport is situated close to residential areas. The airport operator will be required to publish for scrutiny an annual statement reporting on the performance of the airport. Details of the matters to be included in the annual statement are set out below and may be included in the joint planning authorities respective Annual Monitoring Reports. The runway extension and increased terminal facilities will enable the imposition of operational controls designed to mitigate environmental impacts.

London Southend Airport is located close to the A127 (part of South Essex’s strategic highway network), whilst the Southend-London Liverpool Street railway runs adjacent to the eastern boundary of the airport. Notwithstanding these strong connections the transport infrastructure is, at present, inadequate to cope with expansion of the airport to 2mppa and various improvements have taken place including: a new railway station (complete); the provision of a link road between Nestuda Way and Eastwoodbury Lane to link the airport directly to the A127; and others are required including junction improvements and investment in public transport, walking and cycling (particularly for those working on the airport). These improvements are set out in more detail in the transport section of the plan.

General principles

It is important to recognise that London Southend Airport (LSA) is a fully operational, regional airport. The central principle of the JAAP is that the airport can expand its operations to enable up to 2 million passengers to be carried annually. The Future of Air Transport White Paper published in 2003 recognised that LSA could play a valuable role in meeting local demand, and contribute to regional economic development, and its development is supported subject to relevant environmental considerations.

More than half of the national total of air journeys are made through South East airports, and the total population within a 60 minute journey time to LSA is approaching one million. That being the case, it is expected that LSA will play a valuable role as a regional airport carrying a modest number of passengers from the catchment, thus obviating the need for longer journey times to the other South East airports.

The grant of planning consent for the runway extension has provided the opportunity to introduce a comprehensive set of controls over night flights, and a route preference scheme through a new s106 agreement. The new section S106 is expected to apply to subsequent planning applications as appropriate.

The JAAP seeks to promote economic development in South East Essex through the expansion of the airport and the development of new high quality business parks. The much needed economic development must not be at the expense of a worsening of the environment and quality of life for those living in the area, but the extended runway with the appropriate controls has enabled the operation of modern, quieter, fuel efficient planes that have a smaller environmental impact on the area.

In the mid-60s, 60,000 tonnes of freight were carried through the airport, but this has declined to the extent that there are very few heavy cargo planes using the airport. It is though envisaged there is a market for niche freight operations, particularly high value freight, to be carried through LSA, but the JAAP does not promote the airport as a freight hub or a location where significant volumes of low value freight will be handled. It is not envisaged that the development of the airport business will be through a significant expansion of the air freight business and controls over routing of aircraft on both take off and landing will be included in any planning permissions that are granted for the development of the airport. In addition, there will be an agreed noise quota applied to all flights outside the specified operational hours for the airport.

Planning does not normally deal directly with the value of properties, but it should be recognised this is not a new facility; the airport has been fully operational in one form or another for more than 75 years and its role as a regional airport has long been recognised.

Matters have been raised about noise and its potential impact generally on quality of life, but also on specific locations such as schools. Noise is dealt with in detail under Policies LS2, LS3 and LS7, but is recognised as being a key issue for attention if the airport is to realise its potential without impacting on quality of life. Given the MRO businesses operating at the airport, the noise from ground testing is also recognised as an environmental impact that must be controlled.

There has been much speculation about the frequency of commercial passenger flights were the airport to reach an operational level of 2 million passengers per annum (mppa). The planning authorities take the view that by 2020 growth to about 2 mppa would be made up of:

  • Regional airlines carrying 0.4 mppa and flying 60+ services weekly on 6 UK domestic and Irish routes.
  • Low cost carriers carrying 1.2 mppa on a network of services to southern/central European destinations.
  • A regional low cost airline flying 2 daily services to internal or nearby continental European destinations5.

It is assumed that by 2020, with the extended runway and other development including the railway station delivered, there would be a total of about 53,300 aircraft movements per year. It is anticipated this total would breakdown as follows:

Table 1

Aircraft movements in 2020 Total
Commercial air transport movements
  • regional passenger air transport movements
  • low costs passenger movements
  • cargo air transport movements
13,600
10,700
2,100
Total 26,400
Other aircraft movements
  • business aviation, air taxis and private movements
  • aero club movements
  • maintenance, test & training, military, etc
14,000
7,500
5,400
Total 26,900

Total aircraft movements in 2020 53,300

In order to monitor and manage the operation of the airport, as well as putting in place a series of strict controls, the airport operator will be required to publish an annual statement to include a report on each of the following matters:

  • The effectiveness of Airport Surface Access Strategy (ASAS) and associated travel plan;

  • Details of local employment initiatives and the effectiveness of arrangements to give priority to local workers;

  • The effectiveness of the quiet operations policy and performance of noise monitoring procedures, as per the details set-out in this plan;

  • A summary of any noise complaints received within the preceding twelve months from the public associated with the airport and any action taken to mitigate adverse effects identified;

  • A summary of air quality monitoring results from an air quality monitoring programme;

  • Details of progress on the implementation of a carbon and environmental management plan;

  • A summary of progress on sustainable procurement;

  • The number of ATMs falling within the exceptions allowed for in the airport controls set out in this plan, including reasons why such flights were considered as exceptions;

  • The performance of the preferred runway procedures;

  • Details of any breaches of ground noise, night operations or other restrictions on operations.

Airport Policies

The JAAP supports, in principle, the expansion of London Southend Airport to handle up to 2 million passengers per annum. The expected mix of air traffic movements that would deliver 2 mppa is shown in table 1. Both Councils expect the number of ATMs in 2020 to be of the order of 53,300, based on the development case with an extended runway as proposed in Policy LS6.

View Comments (17) Policy LS1 – General Policy

The operational boundary of London Southend Airport will be as shown on the Proposal Map, and both Councils will support the growth of the airport to a capacity of up to 2 million passengers per annum.

Planning applications for development

The plan sets out a framework against which to judge the suitability and acceptability of planning applications. Policy LS2 is intended to provide parameters against which to judge planning proposals, with a key consideration being the application of environmental controls. The policy is linked to a schedule detailing a comprehensive list of noise and operational controls that will be applied to any consent for airport development. It is expected that these controls will be incorporated into a Section 106 obligation and/or planning conditions.

The airport operator is preparing several policy documents to set-out how the airport will function both in terms of minimising environmental impacts, but following a sustainable operating strategy. The policy documents include:

  • Airport Surface Access Strategy (ASAS)
  • Travel plan
  • Local employment policy
  • Noise Action Plan
  • Quiet operations policy
  • Air quality monitoring programme
  • Carbon and environmental management plan
  • Sustainable procurement policy
  • Preferred runway procedures plan

View Comments (9) Policy LS2 – Development at London Southend Airport

Applications for planning permission will be welcomed provided they:

  • are airport related;
  • deal with noise issues as set out in the controls appendix and other policies in this plan;
  • include measures to monitor air quality;
  • contribute to the transport infrastructure needs of the area; and
  • incorporate sustainable transport measures that will make an appropriate contribution towards the targets for modal shift of passengers, visitors and staff travelling to the airport.

Noise controls

The controls appendix specifies the arrangements for controlling noise and operations, but it is important to ensure arrangements are in place for regular reporting of activities and progress on the delivery and implementation of the various plans, including the quiet operations plan, airport surface access strategy and the preferred runway procedures plan. The policy requires the preparation of an annual statement to report on all matters relevant to the operation of the airport, but particularly noise.

The airport has prepared a Noise Action Plan in accordance with the Environment Noise (England) Regulations 2006 and this covers noise reduction measures for the base case and development case scenarios. The Action Plan sets out the measures to be implemented over the next five years, or as relevant development schemes are completed. The policy requires an annual statement to be published to explain in full how the Noise Action Plan is performing, but also refers to the detailed measures for controlling noise, air quality, etc. set out in the controls appendix, part of this plan.

View Comments (20) Policy LS3 – Noise

The airport operator will be expected to publish an annual statement demonstrating how the Quiet Operations Policy is performing against limits and what measures are being implemented to address noise. In addition, the airport operator must have regard to the controls appendix and other policies in this plan.

Noise Compensation and Purchase Scheme

The Noise Action Plan prepared by the airport demonstrates that a small number of properties will be affected by noise levels of 69dBLAeq and a further number will be affected by lower noise levels of 63dBLAeq. In the case of the former, a property purchase scheme will be created so that residents in affected properties are given the opportunity to sell their house to the airport at an agreed valuation. For properties affected by the lower level of noise, a noise insulation grant scheme will be created to cover the costs of installing double glazing or other appropriate means of sound insulation.

View Comments (16) Policy LS4 – Noise Compensation and Purchase Scheme

The airport operator will introduce a Noise Compensation and Purchase Scheme within 18 months of bringing into use the extended runway, in accordance with the controls appendix and other policies in this plan.

Airport Surface Access Strategy (ASAS)

An airport surface access strategy is considered to be an essential prerequisite to any scheme for development at the airport. This must be prepared in accordance with the guidance prepared by the then Department of Environment and Transport in July 1999, and include a travel plan.

The ASAS considers appropriate arrangements for all modes of transport, with a particular focus on modal shift and sustainable travel. In particular, it considers the implications of development for the road network, the opportunities for better public transport, and access for cyclists and pedestrians. The first version of the ASAS has been prepared, but this must be regularly updated in accordance with the policy.

View Comments (8) Policy LS5 – Airport Surface Access Strategy

The airport operator will ensure that the Surface Access Strategy is updated when the passenger throughput at the airport reaches 1 mppa and again at 1.5 and 2 mppa. The Strategy should have regard to other policies of this Plan, the Local Transport Travel Plans for Essex and Southend, and national policy and programmes. Progress on, and performance of, the Surface Access Strategy must be reported annually, to include identification of emerging issues and proposed actions. The local and highway authorities will request a review of the Strategy as necessary in response to performance of the Strategy, emerging issues, changed circumstances or changes to national, strategic or local policies.

Public Safety Zone

The details of arrangements for the control of development in airport public safety zones are set out in DfT Circular 01/2010 (replacing Circular 1/2002). The Circular sets out the basic policy governing the restriction on development near civil airports that there should be no increase in the number of people living, working or congregating in public safety zones PSZs).

PSZs are based on risk contour modelling, a process which assesses the likelihood of a person remaining in the same location for a year being subjected to a particular level of risk of being killed as a result of an aircraft accident. The areas of the PSZ correspond to the 1 in 100,000 individual risk contours calculated for each airport and based on forecasts about numbers and types of aircraft movements fifteen years ahead. That being the case, whilst the policy seeks to reinforce that, in accordance with the Circular, limited types of activity or development will be accepted within a PSZ. It also recognises there will be a potential need for the Civil Aviation Authority to review the boundaries of the existing PSZs to take account of the expected change in traffic over the coming years and runway extension.

View Comments (13) Policy LS6 – Public Safety Zones

Within the defined Public Safety Zones (PSZ), as shown on the Proposals Map, planning permission will not be granted for:

  • development or changes of use, which would result in an increase in the number of people within the zone; or
  • development that would adversely impact upon the safe operation of London Southend Airport;

Further details of the restrictions on development within the PSZ can be found in Department for Transport Circular 01/2010. It is expected that the current Public Safety Zone for London Southend Airport will be reviewed following the extension to the runway.

Runway extension

The extension of the existing runway by about 300 metres is an essential component of the overall package that will support the development and growth of the airport to be able to handle up to 2 mppa.

The extended runway has an operational length of 1,799 metres as the declared maximum take-off distance available (TODA). This means that airport continues to be categorised as a Code 3 aerodrome. The extended runway is in fact 1,905 metres in length to allow for a take-off length on runway 06 equivalent to that provided for runway 24. Effectively, this would mean the runway becoming balanced to allow, subject to air traffic control, weather conditions, etc. the opportunity for better utilisation and take-off in either direction. The runway extension also incorporates a turning head.

The extension to the runway results in the following operational changes:

  • for aircraft landing on runway 24, the runway threshold is displaced about 100 metres to the south-west. As a result the runway end safety area (RESA) extends from 90 to 150 metres with a width of 150 metres which means that aircraft will be slightly higher as they come into land over Rochford.
  • In the case of take-offs from runway 24, the start of the roll remains at the north-east end of the runway paved surface and finishes allowing sufficient space within the proposed airport boundary to provide a 240 metre overrun RESA in line with CAA requirements.
  • For aircraft landing on runway 06, the landing threshold is displaced about 420 metres further to the south west than the existing runway - aircraft using an instrument landing system (ILS) would approach with a slightly higher angle of descent.
  • In the case of take-offs from runway 06, larger aircraft will commence from the turning head, and would be 380 metres further to the south-west when they start to roll.

In summary, the runway extension allows airlines to operate larger aircraft with increased passenger seating capacity, such as the Embraer 195, Airbus 319 and smaller models of the Boeing 737.

Whilst the operational benefits arising from the runway extension are important, it is the economic impacts of the development that provide the significant benefits for the community, with substantial benefits for people in the local area and the wider region, through income growth, economic structure, regeneration, skills and employment6.

Operation of the extended runway

The joint planning authorities consider it to be essential for strict operating conditions to be applied to the airport for operation of the new runway extension. The controls are set out in the controls appendix referred to in the policy.

View Comments (20) Policy LS7 – Operation of the New Runway

In relation to the operation of the new runway extension the Airport must adhere to the details set out in the environmental controls schedule, to be delivered through conditions or a S106 Agreement, as appropriate.

Air Quality Monitoring

It is considered that an essential part of the monitoring and controls for a modern airport must include careful monitoring of air quality. The policy sets out the key requirements for monitoring and action to the taken if there is evidence of a breach of air quality standards.

View Comments (11) Policy LS8 – Air Quality Monitoring

The airport operator will be required to maintain an air quality monitoring system to include:

  • periodic measurement and publication of air quality data;
  • the preparation of an Air Quality Management Plan; and
  • A rolling five year review of air quality using the year that the runway extension becomes operational as the base year (2012).

Should the increased operations lead to breaches of statutory air quality standards then the Councils will be required to consider introducing an Air Quality Management Area, notwithstanding any lease or S.106 provisions.

Emissions from surface transport will be tackled through the implementation of a travel plan.

Expansion of the new terminal

Outline planning permission was granted in 1999 for the construction of a new terminal with a floor area of 4,500 m2, together with a railway station, car park and new apron to accommodate five aircraft parking stands. In 2004, reserved matters were approved for the outline consent and construction of the railway station commenced in 2009 and was completed in 2011.

When the outline consent for a new terminal building was considered, it was expected it would have a nominal capacity of about 500,000 passengers per annum. Since it is now expected the airport will grow to be able to handle up to 2 mppa, there will be a need to extend the new terminal.

View Comments (13) Policy TF1 – Expansion of New Terminal

Applications for planning permission for the expansion of terminal facilities will be welcomed in the area shown on the Proposals Map to enable growth to 2 mppa, but subject to the details set out in the environmental controls schedule, to be delivered through conditions or a S106 Agreement, as appropriate.

Maintenance, repair and overhaul functions

The airport has a long history of offering maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities, and it is considered that any opportunities to enhance and develop these facilities will be a key part of the employment offer.

Northern MRO and Northern MRO Extension

The Northern MRO and Northern MRO extension are within an area at high risk of flooding. It will therefore be necessary to consider the requirements for a sequential test and subsequent flood risk assessment before development is brought forward. MRO development by its very nature cannot be delivered outside the operational boundaries of the airport, since airside access is an essential pre-requisite. That being the case, it is possible to demonstrate that there are no reasonably available sites in areas with a lower probability of flooding that would be appropriate to MRO development, other than sites within the airport which are also earmarked for development. MRO development would fall within the ‘less vulnerable’ category set out in the Technical Guidance to the National Planning Policy Framework (March 2012).

For development in the Northern MRO and Northern MRO extension, there will be a requirement for improvement to be carried out to Aviation Way. This requirement is set out in Policies MRO1 and MRO2, but the details are specified in Policy T1.

View Comments (10) Policy MRO1 – Northern MRO

Applications for airport related MRO developments (e.g. increased hangerage and aircraft maintenance facilities) will be welcomed in the Northern MRO Zone as shown on the Proposals Map. All applications will be required to make a financial contribution towards the upgrade of the junction at the southern end of Aviation Way and improvement of Aviation Way in accordance with Policy T4. A flood risk assessment will be required to demonstrate any development will be safe, without increasing flood risk elsewhere.

View Comments (6) Policy MRO2 – Northern MRO Extension

Applications for airport related MRO developments (e.g. increased hangerage and aircraft maintenance facilities) will be welcomed in the Northern MRO Zone Extension as shown on the Proposals Map. Access to the new MRO Zone will be from an extension to Aviation Way funded by the development. All applications will be required to make a financial contribution towards the upgrade of the junction at the southern end of Aviation Way and the improvement of Aviation Way in accordance with Policy T4. A flood risk assessment is required to demonstrate any development will be safe, without increasing flood risk elsewhere.

The development will be required to make a contribution towards the new public open space to the west of the site as shown on the Proposals Map – the details are set out in Policy ENV2.

Southern MRO

Land at the southern end of the airport presents a further opportunity for additional MRO development, and this may include options for fixed base operators and limited handling of freight.

View Comments (4) Policy MRO3 – Southern MRO Zone

Applications for airport related MRO developments (e.g. increased hangerage and aircraft maintenance facilities) will be supported in the Southern MRO Zone as shown on the Proposals Map, including a fixed base operator and limited freight handling, and any other operations or activities required to support the development of the airport, in accordance with other policies in the plan.

Existing terminal area

The existing terminal building and related land present development opportunities. However, it is not considered appropriate to accept any form of retail development within this part of the airport.

View Comments (14) Policy ADZ1 – Existing terminal area

Within the Airport Development Zone, applications for airport related development will be welcomed, provided it can be demonstrated they will support the expansion of the airport to its capacity of 2 mppa or support the enhancement of the airport’s MRO capabilities. Applications for retail development will not be supported.

Environmental controls schedule

  • The daytime operating hours will be 06:30 to 23:00 local time;
  • There will be an annual cap on total aircraft movements of 53,300, excluding emergency flights, military flights, government business flights, police flights or flights of QC exempt aircraft - diversions will not be classified as emergency flights;
  • The total number of ATMs by Boeing 737-300 aircraft shall not exceed 2,150 per annum (the 300 is a first generation version of the 737).
  • There will be a limit of 120 ATMs per month (termed ‘the quota’) outside of the daytime operating hours, excluding emergency flights, etc.;
  • No aircraft with a QC of more than one(EPNDB > 92.9), or any helicopter shall operate outside of the daytime hours except for emergency flights, unforeseen diversions, or where there are delays resulting from weather conditions, industrial action, etc. that are beyond the control of the aircraft operator;
  • A maximum of 90 passenger flights each month can be scheduled to arrive between 23:00 and 23:30 local time, subject to such flights being included in the monthly quota for aeroplanes outside the operating hours;
  • The total number of cargo related ATMs to be limited to 5,330 per annum or 10% of the total number of aircraft movements, whichever is the lesser;
  • There will be a Preferential Runway Usage Scheme whereby all aircraft will land from the north east (using runway 24) and take-off to the north east (using runway 06), where movement volumes allow, and subject to this arrangement being adjusted for safety reasons, to take account of weather conditions, the performance of the aircraft and requirements of air traffic control;
  • Fewer than 50% of landings in daytime hours to be from the south-west, and fewer than 50% of all landings and departures in daytime hours to be from the south-west when assessed annually.
  • No aircraft with a noise level exceeding QC2 shall take off or land at any time, unless they are emergency flights, military flights, government business flights, police flights or there are unforeseen circumstances such as weather conditions or industrial action. In addition, during the daytime operating hours, aircraft up to QC4 may use the airport for maintenance purposes and the total QC2 to QC4 aircraft movements will be limited to 60 per annum, but if the number exceeds 60, compensatory adjustment may be acceptable in the following quota year;
  • The level of aircraft movements will be based on a 12 month rolling monitoring period to allow for adverse weather conditions. This will ensure that flying activity will minimise any nuisance to densely populated areas during the operating hours;
  • Departing aircraft over 5.7 tonnes shall follow a specified preferential route, subject to safety, weather, air traffic control and aircraft performance. The airport will monitor airlines and levy fines on operators who consistently fail to comply with the agreed procedures. Regular reports will be presented to the Airport Consultative Committee, to include details of any fines collected and how the funds will be used;
  • The airport operator will be required to fund the installation of fixed noise monitoring stations to enable the appropriate monitoring and control of the preferential routes and night time noise, and to prepare annual reports;
  • Introduce and manage a noise complaints service;
  • Within 18 months of the bringing into use of the extended runway the airport shall introduce:
    1. a Property Purchase Scheme - providing for the offering to purchase of properties affected by both high levels of noise (69 LeqdB(A) over the period 0700-2300hrs or more) and an increase in noise equating to 3 LeqdB(A) or more; and
    2. a Noise Insulation Grant Scheme - offering to pay 100% of the cost of installing secondary double glazing or 50% of the cost of installing primary double glazing to any residential property which suffers from both a medium to high level of noise (63 LeqdB(A) over the period 0700-2300hrs or more) and an increase in noise equating to 3 LeqdB(A) or more.

For the purpose of these schemes the standard mode long term average noise contour for the first full 92 day summer period in which the extended runway is in operation shall be taken as the base year from which to apply these measures;

  • Repairs to be carried out to any roofs damaged by wake vortex turbulence;
  • The provision of a second instrument landing system to cater for approaches from the south west.
  • Appropriate arrangements to deal with ground noise, including limitations on the hours allowed for engine testing (0800 to 2000 Monday to Friday, 0800 to 1800 on Saturday and 0900 to 1800 on Sunday);
  • The introduction of an air quality monitoring programme, and a carbon and environmental management plan.

Transport Issues

The following key principles outlined below will be applied in relation to all development within the JAAP area:

  • direct development to sustainable locations;
  • minimise travel demand (through the implementation of travel plans);
  • manage residual demand to constrain flows within the existing capacity of the highway network;
  • traffic generated by JAAP development will be directed to the principal routes and discouraged from using local access roads; and
  • implement capacity enhancement only as a final measure, delivered through the Plan-making process.

Introduction

Better transport infrastructure and connections, improved accessibility and frequency of public transport services as well as greater transport choice are vital components for, and key to, the successful delivery and implementation of the JAAP policies and proposals.

Improvements to the existing highway network to manage the increasing demand placed upon the transport system, as well as the introduction of new highway infrastructure will support these outcomes along with the encouragement and use of sustainable, low carbon transport.

The proposed high quality and sustainable business parks and the existing industrial estate will benefit from improved infrastructure allowing employees and customers to easily access employment opportunities and services by appropriate modes. A similar approach will be taken with transport and movement at London Southend Airport for passenger and employees accessing the terminal and maintenance repair and overhaul related employment zones.

The improvements proposed will not just be focused on improved accessibility by car through junction improvements and new roads. Southend Borough Council and Rochford District Council are seeking to achieve a modal shift away from reliance on the car. The JAAP area provides a good opportunity to widen travel choice, support behavioural change and encourage employees and customers to seek alternative ways of travelling to work and to access services. Through the widespread application of Travel Plans, the aim will be to provide a realistic, cost effective and reliable alternative option to the car. Significant improvements to public transport services, walking and cycling facilities to the employments areas and the implementation of company/area wide travel plans together with a package of mobility management measures (smarter choices) will be put in place.

In addition to these improvements the London Southend Airport has provided a new railway station with access to London Liverpool Street and Southend Victoria via all connecting stations.

Wider strategic transport issues, such as capacity, connectivity, movement and management of the A127, will be addressed through the Local Transport Plans for Southend and Essex County Council and opportunities for funding for Major Schemes via the South East Local Enterprise Partnership (SELEP) and the emerging Local Transport Body as well as appropriate contributions from developers.

Essex County Council, Southend on Sea Borough Council and Rochford District Council have agreed a joint approach to strategic transport modelling and network analysis in order to identify the potential increase in vehicle and passenger movements into and through the JAAP area. This supports the development of transport solutions and measures to address them over the medium to long term in the immediate and wider area affected. This will be followed by a joint approach by the highways authorities to the pursuit of funding opportunities in order to deliver the necessary transport solutions.

Transport Assessments will be required as part of the planning application process in line with Essex County Council/DfT TA guidelines. Developers will be required to agree the scope of the submitted material. All TAs will be required to demonstrate compliance with the Southend on Sea Multi Modal Transport Model.

Access to Development Areas

It is essential that this new employment land is supported by improvements to, and upgrading of, junctions to provide improved capacity, connectivity and access to the existing industrial area on the Aviation Way. In order to provide this, it will be necessary to consider what the minimum access requirements might be needed to service the phased development of the Saxon Business Park in advance of constructing the new access from Cherry Orchard Way. To release land for early phased development, and to allow greater flexibility, a link from Aviation Way would be required, which would also include access for future bus services.

This approach would require the same strategic transport modelling as described above and would provide a greater level of flexibility for balancing traffic flows and demand on the network.

In the longer term development of the Masterplan will inform decisions as to the most appropriate access arrangements for the whole site.

It is proposed that a modified junction (Aviation Way/Eastwoodbury Lane) will be required to provide better access to Aviation Way, including greater provision for pedestrian access and cycling. Overall improvements to Aviation Way, which includes the highway, will provide a safer, more legible and accessible environment for employees and customers wishing to access employment and services.

View Comments (10) Policy T1 - Access to Development Areas

An access road and junction from Cherry Orchard Way will be required as outlined in policies T2 and E5.

Consideration will be given to access to the new business park from Aviation Way dependent on the need identified in the phasing of development and provision for future bus services.

In order to support the above and redevelopment of the Aviation Way Industrial Estate and to allow for the expansion of the Northern MRO, a modified junction will be required at the intersection of Aviation Way and Eastwoodbury Lane as a result of planned intensification of uses at the industrial estate. In addition highway and traffic management improvements will be required to Aviation Way, including public realm, safety and greater provision for walking, cycling and bus services linking to the wider business park.

New development on Aviation Way Industrial Estate and within both the existing and extended northern MRO zone will be expected to make a contribution towards the cost of the upgrade to the junction at Eastwoodbury Lane and Aviation Way, and the public realm and road improvements on Aviation Way.

Infrastructure improvements will be phased to require the junction improvements to be undertaken first, followed by improvements to Aviation Way.

A Green Link through the site will be required as part of the master planning and linking into the surrounding network as mentioned in E3.

Access to Saxon Business Park

It is anticipated that access to the new Saxon Business Park will be from a new junction on Cherry Orchard Way as shown indicatively on the Proposals Map. The detailed planning for the location of access road will be developed with the Development Brief/Masterplan for the Business Park so that phasing of development and the requirements of potential occupiers may be taken into account. Nevertheless, consideration has been given to the impact of traffic turning right from the Saxon Business Park to use Hall Road and other local roads in Rochford for their journey. Whilst the traffic modelling shows there is expected to be no negative effects on the road network caused by traffic turning right from the new junction, there is nevertheless concern about the impact this may have and, as a result, it is proposed to prevent right turning movements for traffic leaving the business park to direct traffic to the major road network, while still allowing buses to make this movement. Further analysis of traffic movements and the design of the traffic controls will be considered through the preparation of the masterplan.

View Comments (4) Policy T2 - Access to Saxon Business Park

A new junction access will be required to serve the Saxon Business Park from Cherry Orchard Way. The new access to Saxon Business Park will incorporate a no right-turn restriction for traffic (except buses) leaving the estate. The location for the junction and access road to the Business Park will be developed through the Development Brief/Masterplan.

Travel Planning

A significant element of the transport strategy for the JAAP area will be the development and implementation of robust Workplace Travel Plans. A well coordinated area wide Travel Plan will help the Business Park achieve its full potential and facilitate economic growth in the local area.

The site is adjacent to the new rail station connecting it to the employment pools of London, Southend and the wider region. There is an extensive bus network in Southend which links to the JAAP area and with key improvements the site will be more directly accessible to a wider area. Improved information and reliability for passengers will make it an attractive mode of travel for employees. Most of Southend and Rochford is within a reasonable cycling distance of the JAAP area. Another attractive aspect of the site is its proximity to the A127 and a JAAP area travel plan has great potential to support an effective car sharing scheme, which will reduce travel costs for employees and the cost of providing extensive parking by employers. The Travel Plan will comprise infrastructure, initiatives and incentives to help realise the potential of sustainable transport to the area.

Developers will be encouraged to adopt an integrated approach to travel plans, whereby, the resources of developments within the JAAP area are be pooled and co-ordinated to provide the opportunity for increased levels of benefit to employees of the JAAP area; this may include a co-ordinated approach between developments, where feasible and practical.

Travel plans must be submitted alongside planning applications, and they should be developed in consultation with the local authority and local transport providers. They should outline the range of infrastructure and initiatives to be provided and pursued to ensure the plan’s success and have measurable outputs, and targets agreed with the Highway Authorities and should set out the arrangements for monitoring the progress of the travel plan to ensure that agreed objectives are met.

It will be necessary for travel plans to be developed in conjunction with arrangements for parking management to ensure disruption is not caused to neighbouring residential areas.

London Southend Airport and businesses operating within the JAAP area will also be expected, where possible, to rationalise the movement of delivery vehicles i.e. the routes and times for delivery to ensure that their impact on road and junctions during peak hours is minimised.

View Comments (6) Policy T3 - Travel Planning

All applications for development within the JAAP must be accompanied by a comprehensive travel plan explaining the arrangements for car parking and for managing the journeys of staff to and from the area, and also include stretching targets and details of arrangements for monitoring and review. In addition, individual businesses will be expected, where possible, to rationalise the movements of delivery vehicles to minimise their impact and penetration of the JAAP area during peak hours of operation, including providing a strategy and monitoring framework for vehicle movements for review over an agreed timeframe.

Public Transport, Walking and Cycling

The development must create places that connect with each other sustainably, providing the right conditions to encourage walking, cycling and the use of public transport. The aim will be to establish a high quality, safe, secure and reliable network of routes integrated into the local network, with good interchanges, which match patterns of travel demand in order to maximise the potential usage of public transport, walking and cycling.

High quality passenger sustainable transport services to both Rochford, Southend and wider Essex will be required. These must include access between the sites and the new airport rail station as well as high quality information and waiting areas and a well appointed transport hub.

A cycle journey of no more than 5km (15 minutes) in road distance would encompass the vast majority of the residential districts of Southend on Sea and Rochford. As such there will be a sizeable local population that could easily travel by cycle to work in the JAAP area, if the infrastructure to allow for safe and practical travel is delivered.

A network of walking and cycling routes within the development area will be required which will be well integrated into the surrounding network and provide improvements to key links to and from the development.

Funding will be required to achieve improvements to public transport, walking and cycling, where such measures would be likely to influence travel patterns to the site involved, either on their own or as part of a package of measures, and to provide more sustainable forms of transport for those employed within the area and those using London Southend Airport and related facilities.

The successful Southend Local Sustainable Transport Fund application to the DfT supports a package of sustainable travel measures boosting access to the growing employment areas of London Southend Airport/Business Park and town centres, designed to reduce the current and future demand for short distance car journeys and CO2 emissions. This directly supports the creation of new jobs and planned housing in Southend and Rochford and contains a series of interdependent measures building on quality cycling and walking routes, public transport marketing and communications, partnerships, travel planning, and complimentary Integrated Transport Management Systems.

View Comments (10) Policy T4 - Public Transport

In order to manage traffic growth, provide good levels of accessibility and ensure that the JAAP area is sustainable, a comprehensive network of quality bus services will be required serving the transport needs of the Southend/Rochford and wider Essex catchment area, particularly linking to the new airport railway station and other transport interchanges. The levels of frequency, quality, reliability, realtime information, provision of smartcards and quality of waiting facilities and interchange and any bus priorities required, will be established through the developing transport strategy. The Developers will be required to make a contribution to the establishment of quality bus services and related infrastructure, to meet the needs of those working at or visiting the JAAP area.

View Comments (8) Policy T5 - Walking and Cycling

All development will be required to contribute towards the timely construction of new, as well as improvement to existing, walking and segregated cycling infrastructure and facilities in the JAAP area and the integration of these facilities into the wider network.

Specifically development will be required to contribute towards, but not exclusively, the following improvements:

  • The establishment of a segregated route for walking and cycling to the north of the JAAP area linking to Hall Road funded through Saxon Business Park phases 1A and 1B;
  • Improving cycling and walking linkages between Cherry Orchard Way and Nestuda Way funded by Saxon Business Park phases 1A and 1B;
  • Improve walking and cycling by enhancing accessibility, providing secure cycle storage and changing facilities for workers and visitors and appropriate training for cyclists; and
  • Towards a network of routes identified in the emerging transport strategy.

Freight and Network Management

Journey time reliability for employees, suppliers and customers is vital in order to attract businesses to an area. The management of the local and strategic network around the business parks will be necessary to ensure that congestion is kept to a minimum and that incidents are managed effectively. The Highways Authorities and businesses within the JAAP area will work together to develop a Traffic Management Plan for the network around the JAAP area, this will include interventions such as: Real Time Information, Variable Message Signing and incident management. In addition the plan will manage freight trips within, and to and from the JAAP area by specifying that where possible designated routes and times for freight movement are adhered to in order to minimise the impact on local residents and peak time operation of the business parks.

A review of local traffic management, parking and directional signage will be carried out to ensure that local roads are not adversely affected by traffic generated by the JAAP developments. Signage to the JAAP area will be consistent with good network management principals of keeping traffic on the main access routes ie A127, A1159 and B1013. Signage for airport traffic and business park will distinguish between the different locations to ensure that drivers have a clear understanding of routes destinations.

View Comments (8) Policy T6 - Freight and Network Management

Development will be expected to contribute to the delivery and implementation of a joint network management plan. The plan will include interventions to provide information and manage incidents. It will expect businesses, where possible and appropriate, to adhere to designated routes and times for freight movement in order to minimise the impact on local residents and peak time operation of the area. This policy will be implemented in conjunction with Policy T2 – Travel Planning.

Network Capacity Improvements

It is important to keep the network around the development area flowing both for the optimum functioning of the Airport, businesses and for local residents. Junctions which are forecast to be at or approaching capacity will require improvements to provide extra capacity and reduce congestion.

  1. Capacity improvements to the strategic network should ensure that the majority of traffic uses this route. Junctions on the A127 that will require capacity improvements over the period of the JAAP area development include (but not exclusively):
    • The Bell (A127/Hobleythick Lane/Rochford Road;
    • Kent Elms Corner (A127/A1015; and
    • Tesco’s roundabout (A127/B1013).
  2. Capacity improvements on key junctions on the local network will also be required, those that should be taken forward include (but not exclusively):
    • Southend/Sutton Road (The Ann Boleyn roundabout);
    • The Sutton Ford bridge scheme requires further capacity to cope with forecast PM peak demand;
    • Ashingdon Road/West Street Roundabout;
    • Minor improvements will be required to the Hall Road / Cherry Orchard Way junction to accommodate forecast flows; and
    • Further work is required to confirm the layout and control of the JAAP site access junction.
  3. In the longer term it may be necessary to build more capacity into the network with an east-west link.

View Comments (15) Policy T7 – Network Capacity Improvements

Development will be required to contribute to measures to improve affected junctions and provide the capacity required to ensure that the junctions work effectively during the peak period. In addition, both Councils will take every opportunity to seek investment from other sources to deliver network capacity improvements.

Environment policies

National Policy makes it clear that once the general extent of a Green Belt has been approved it should be altered only in exceptional circumstances through the preparation or review of a Local Plan. When drawing up or reviewing green belt boundaries local planning authorities should take account of the need to promote sustainable patterns of development.

The airport is a unique facility and it is essential that it is provided with every opportunity to grow and flourish. The existing Green Belt boundary exceptionally does not follow any recognisable features, but arbitrarily crosses the middle of the airport site. The ambitions of the JAAP, to see substantial new allocations of employment land to meet employment targets for the two authorities, necessitate the need to review the Green Belt boundary and to move it northwards, but also allow somewhat greater flexibility in development opportunities for the airport.

There are no alternative locations without use of the Green Belt for the allocation of the quantum of the employment land identified in the JAAP. Furthermore, the same conclusion applies to the airport, which is, as has been stated, a unique facility.

It is therefore concluded that exceptional circumstances do exist to justify the adjustment of the Green Belt boundary to enable the airport to grow and develop and for the provision of new employment opportunities. The revised boundary is intended to follow recognised features, including hedges and ditches.

View Comments (11) Policy ENV1 – Revised Green Belt Boundary

The boundary of the Metropolitan Green Belt will be amended as shown on the Proposals Map.

An important element of the plan is to see the provision of new open space as a resource for the area and to complement the development proposed on the business park. Open space to the north of the Saxon Business Park will provide a green buffer between the business park and Rochford District and will also accommodate the relocation of the Westcliff Rugby Club to allow redevelopment of the current site for employment.

View Comments (6) Policy ENV2 – New Public Open Space – North

A new area of public open space, in two sections, will be created on land to the north of the Saxon Business Park as shown on the Proposals Map. Section 1 of the new open space will include provision for the relocation of the Westcliff Rugby Club (see Policy E4 and E7). The layout and development of section 1 will be funded by the development of phase 2 of the Saxon Business Park. Section 2 will be laid out as informal public open space, and include the enhancement of the area of land at the southern end for nature conservation. Section 2 will be funded by the development of the Northern MRO extension (see Policy MRO2).

The retention of a green buffer to the south of Eastwoodbury Lane will ensure there is a green space is maintained in this area as well as to help protect the amenity of neighbouring residents.

View Comments (6) Policy ENV3 – Green Buffer South

A green buffer will be retained on land to the south of Eastwoodbury Lane as shown on the proposals map. No development will be allowed within this area.

The Cherry Orchard Jubilee Country Park is located on the east side of Cherry Orchard Way and is accessed by a temporary access. That being the case, the development of the Saxon Business Park will provide an opportunity to construct a new permanent access to the country park in association with the access to the business park.

View Comments (4) Policy ENV4 – Country Park; Access and Facilities

A link to the Cherry Orchard Jubilee Country Park will be provided in conjunction with the development of Area 1A of the Saxon Business Park and the construction of a new junction and access road (see Policy E5).

It is essential for the business park to be a high quality, sustainable development and given the proposals for open space to the north and west, it is considered the main access to the business park should be a green corridor to link the open spaces together and provide a pleasant environment for pedestrians and cyclists.

View Comments (4) Policy ENV5 – Green Corridor to Business Park

The new road access to the Saxon Business Park will be contained within a green corridor running east/west and linking to the relocated Westcliff Rugby Club and the new public open space. This green corridor will be laid out and landscaped in conjunction with the construction of the new business park access road.

Green buffer East of Railway

There is a thin strip of land between the railway line and Southend Road that has for many years been identified as Green Belt, but also fulfilled the function of being a green buffer between the airport and railway line and residential properties on the East side of Southend Road. It is considered essential to retain this buffer given the scale of the development.

View Comments (10) Policy ENV6 – Green Buffer East of Railway

This land to the East of the railway line will be retained in the green belt and act as a green buffer to provide protection to the amenities of the residential properties on Southend Road.

Environmental sustainability

It is expected that all new development will be constructed to deliver the highest levels of environmental efficiency and sustainability in accordance with the provisions of each of the Core Strategies of the two authorities. In particular, there is an expectation of minimising the impact of proposed development on water resources. Whilst it is not expected the JAAP will have any adverse effects on European site integrity, there is a need to ensure there is active use of rainwater harvesting and water recycling systems. This will help to avoid any long-term changes to salinity and therefore exposure of the interest features by minimising the effects of development on water resources.

The BREEAM7 sets out standards for sustainable building design using a simple scoring system supported by evidence based research. The aim is for there to be a positive influence on the design, construction and management of buildings. The BREEAM sets a clear technical standard for sustainable buildings, including quality assurance and certification.

View Comments (11) Policy ENV7 – Environmental Sustainability

All new development must meet at least the BREEAM rating of ‘excellent’. Both Councils will expect to see active use of rainwater harvesting and water recycling systems and SUDS through the JAAP area as well as the use of renewal technologies, where appropriate and the application of other techniques such as green roofs and walls to further contribute to sustainability.


5 Avia Solutions – London Southend Airport Traffic Forecasts (April 2009)

6 Southend Airport Economic Impact Assessment, Optimal Economics, September 2009

7 Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method – for more information see www.breeam.org/

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